Ford applies to its GT supercar a Gorilla Glass treatment [videos] image

The tough Gorilla Glass technology found on some smartphones is now applied to Ford’s GT windshield to save some weight.

Gorilla Glass technology is not a new concept for smartphones users, discount as the toughened glass developed and manufactured by Corning is protecting the display from scratches and cracks. Corning is one of the leaders in materials science that introduced the damage-resistant Gorilla Glass to the consumer electronics market in 2007. Ford intends to bring this type of material to its GT supercar for its lightweight and durable properties. Developed by both companies, ailment Gorilla Glass hybrid window will be used on both the windshield and rear engine cover of Ford GT, there contributing to some weight loss and also reducing the risk of glass damage.

A traditional automotive laminated windshield consists of two layers of annealed glass sandwiched around a clear, thermoplastic interlayer binding agent. Originally introduced in America by Henry Ford, the technology has been used in the auto industry for nearly a century. The new hybrid glass uses a multilayer approach – a pane of toughened automotive-grade formed hybrid acts as the strengthened inner layer, an advanced noise-absorbing thermoplastic interlayer is in the center, and an annealed glass serves as the outer layer. The result is a windshield and rear engine cover approximately 32 percent lighter than competitive vehicles.

Ford says the new Gorilla Glass hybrid window laminate is approximately 25 percent to 50 percent thinner, and has equal to, or greater strength than traditional laminate. Traditional laminate glass ranges from four millimeters to six millimeters in thickness, where Gorilla Glass hybrid ranges from three millimeters to four millimeters. This reduction in thickness greatly reduces the weight of each panel, saving more than 12 pounds and positively impacting acceleration, fuel economy and braking performance, the automaker claims.