New V12 engine and transmission from Lamborghini image

Lamborghini unveiled today a new engine: the twelve-cylinder with 6.5 liter displacement, output of 525 kW (700 hp) and maximum torque of 690 Newton meters.

And to complete the circle, this new engine will come with a new state of the art transmission: the “Lamborghini ISR” automated manual gearbox combines minimal shift times and everyday usability with low weight and dimensions to guarantee that emotional sensation from gearshifts, which customers expect from a super sports car at the very top of the premier league.

This new power train will enter production early 2011.

Even in the world of super sports cars, 515 kW (700 hp) at 8,250 rpm sets a new benchmark. Maximum torque stands at 690 Newton meters and is available at 5,500 rpm.

The extremely well-rounded torque curve, beefy pulling power in every situation, incredibly spontaneous responsiveness and, not least, the finely modulated but always highly emotional acoustics make this engine a stunning power unit of the very highest order. Not only was it developed entirely in-house by Lamborghini, it is also manufactured from start to finish at company headquarters in Sant’Agata Bolognese.


For optimum weight, the crankcase and the four-valve cylinder heads are made from aluminum-silicon alloy. The intake system with four individual throttle valves is highly complex – an extremely well-rounded torque curve and outstanding pulling power across the rev range the reward. The exhaust system delivers the lowest emission levels, as well as that unmistakable, spine-tingling Lamborghini sound – from a moderate rumble when cruising through the city at low revs to the howling crescendo of gears at their limits.

The new ingenious Lamborghini ISR transmission combines extremely fast shift times – almost 50 percent shorter than with a dual-clutch transmission – with the benefits of manual shifting when it comes to low weight and compact dimensions, both always crucial for a super sports car.

The low shift times are enabled through the transmission’s particular design, known as ISR (Independent Shifting Rod). Instead of taking place in series, as with a conventional gearbox, shifting can occur virtually in parallel. While one shifting rod is moving out of one gear, the second shifting rod can already engage the next.
Moreover, the transmission weighs only 79 kilograms – a distinct benefit, even against comparable DSG transmissions, which are considerably heavier.