Quarter century anniversary of the McLaren F1 marked with the same press release image

The British exotic manufacturer has decided to pay homage to its flawless McLaren F1 supercar by reissuing the original model’s press release.

Those were the times when having a McLaren road car was not only new as an idea, but also very exotic. The brand’s name is an icon among automotive enthusiasts today – but at that point the company was a racing household and that was about all to it. In 1992 though, the incredible McLaren F1 was a major announcement for the company – and in a bid to rekindle the excitement they decided to mark the car’s 25th anniversary by reintroducing the same, original press release and photo gallery for the F1. If you’d like to get transported back through time, read the excerpt below.

Quarter century anniversary of the McLaren F1 marked with the same press release 7

“The primary design consideration for the McLaren F1 has been to make it without reserve ‘a driver’s car’, an extremely high-performance design which advances all conventional boundaries. It combines Formula 1 racing car dynamics with genuine Grand Touring capabilities,” the release reads. “The objective has been simply to build, not only the finest high-performance sports car ever made, but also ever likely to be made.”

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The F1 – just like McLaren road cars today, was using a carbon-composite tub to make sure weight is kept in check – tipping the scales at just 2,244 pounds. “Nothing other than carbon composite was ever considered” during the development process, the company proudly tells us. But there were other fan facts: unique suspension dampers came from Bilstein, brakes with four-piston front calipers came courtesy of Brembo and Goodyear developed special high-speed F1 tires that were good at 200-plus-mph speeds. And in the back of the quirky three-seat layout sat a 6.1-liter V12 engine built by BMW Motorsport delivering “over” 550 horsepower and 442 pound-feet of torque, mated to a six-speed manual transaxle.