Renault achieved a new sales record in 2015, targeting further growth image

The French carmaker reported its third consecutive year of sales growth, the success prompting Renault to hope for a further increase in 2016.

In a global market that grew by 1.6 percent, Groupe Renault has announced it achieved a 3.3 percent rise for its passenger cars and light commercial vehicles registrations in 2015, thus marking the third consecutive year of sales advance and a new record at the same time. The French carmaker says its worldwide market share now stands at 3.2 percent. A strong year has also been posted by the Romanian Dacia brand, Renault’s affordable marquee. From the total of 2,801,592 vehicles sold worldwide, Europe accounted for 1,613,499 units, Renault’s sales in the region rising 10.2 percent in 2015, outpacing the market’s 9.4 percent growth. The Group reported increased sales in all European countries, with particularly strong performances in Spain (+22.3%), the United Kingdom (+17.7%) and Italy (+18%), with a record market share of 9.1 percent.

However, deliveries dropped 14.8 percent in South America and 8.6 percent in Renault’s Eurasia region, which is mainly Russia, broadly in line with the collapsing demand in those markets. Excluding France and the European countries, Renault sold 1,188,093 cars last year on other markets, with 4.8 percent fewer vehicles than in 2014. Ten years after its debut in Europe, the Dacia brand recorded further growth in its registrations in 2015 (+3.6%), and marked record sales of 374,458. The best-selling model remained Clio 4 with 372,062 units.

In 2016, the global market is expected to record growth of 1 to 2 percent compared with 2015, with a 2 percent increase in Europe. At the International level, Renault foresees the Brazilian and Russian markets to decline further, by 6 percent and 12 percent respectively, while China should grow with 4 to 5 percent. “Our growth will accelerate in 2016 and we will improve our positions in all our regions,” Sales Chief Thierry Koskas said in a statement.