Mar.18 (GMM/Inautonews.com) Carlos Sainz has refused to join the criticism of the latest rule changes in formula one.

In Melbourne, not only is the controversial new ‘musical chairs’ qualifying set to make its debut, but so too is a further clampdown on pit-to-car radio communications.

Many have not been shy to let their opinions be heard.

Referring to the new qualifying format, Red Bull’s Dr Helmut Marko said: “What if there is a red or yellow flag or it’s raining?

“Now, if you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time on a Saturday, you’re out,” he told Austria’s Kleine Zeitung newspaper.

Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel added: “I hope at least that in the end the fastest driver is still at the top. Otherwise it’s pretty questionable from a sporting point of view.”

Renault driver Kevin Magnussen is also concerned about the actual spectacle of qualifying.

“I’m worried that it will get boring towards the end because people will be happy with their times and not want to use another set of tyres,” he is quoted by Denmark’s BT newspaper.

And he also thinks the new radio clampdown could hurt F1.

“I agree with the idea that it should be harder to drive in formula one,” said Magnussen. “But with the new rules we will be putting so much energy on the information on the steering wheel.

“Before, we just got a message from the pits and we could just focus on racing hard,” he added. “So it could have the opposite effect than what they want.”

Toro Rosso driver Sainz, however, is refusing to join the widespread criticism, preferring instead to at least give the new rules a chance.

“I don’t want to criticise,” he told Spain’s AS newspaper, “because too many people are doing that and there is too much negativity right now about F1.

“I don’t like that whenever I open a newspaper or a website about F1 and the first things you read are just negative,” said Sainz.

“So I’ll give the changes they are making a chance, both the qualifying and the radio and the other things, and we’ll see what happens.

“If it doesn’t work I’ll be the first to say it, but first you have to at least see if it helps or not,” he added.


Mar.18 (GMM/Inautonews.com) Carlos Sainz has refused to join the criticism of the latest rule changes in formula one.

In Melbourne, not only is the controversial new ‘musical chairs’ qualifying set to make its debut, but so too is a further clampdown on pit-to-car radio communications.

Many have not been shy to let their opinions be heard.

Referring to the new qualifying format, Red Bull’s Dr Helmut Marko said: “What if there is a red or yellow flag or it’s raining?

“Now, if you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time on a Saturday, you’re out,” he told Austria’s Kleine Zeitung newspaper.

Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel added: “I hope at least that in the end the fastest driver is still at the top. Otherwise it’s pretty questionable from a sporting point of view.”

Renault driver Kevin Magnussen is also concerned about the actual spectacle of qualifying.

“I’m worried that it will get boring towards the end because people will be happy with their times and not want to use another set of tyres,” he is quoted by Denmark’s BT newspaper.

And he also thinks the new radio clampdown could hurt F1.

“I agree with the idea that it should be harder to drive in formula one,” said Magnussen. “But with the new rules we will be putting so much energy on the information on the steering wheel.

“Before, we just got a message from the pits and we could just focus on racing hard,” he added. “So it could have the opposite effect than what they want.”

Toro Rosso driver Sainz, however, is refusing to join the widespread criticism, preferring instead to at least give the new rules a chance.

“I don’t want to criticise,” he told Spain’s AS newspaper, “because too many people are doing that and there is too much negativity right now about F1.

“I don’t like that whenever I open a newspaper or a website about F1 and the first things you read are just negative,” said Sainz.

“So I’ll give the changes they are making a chance, both the qualifying and the radio and the other things, and we’ll see what happens.

“If it doesn’t work I’ll be the first to say it, but first you have to at least see if it helps or not,” he added.