Top 10 new cars for teenagers – US image

Since autumn is getting closer, your kids might want a ride to school. If you’re busy and cannot take them there, how about helping them with a brand new car?

No, we’re not talking about Lamborghinis and Ferraris, but we have gathered for you practical cars that are safe for teens, affordable for your pockets and still entertaining for the youngsters.

You can check out below our top choices, their prices which include ownership and the info you need to see what the best fit for your teen is.

Honda Fit

Price: $28,018

MPG: 29 City, 37 Highway

This is a fun and practical car to own due to its “magic seats”. The car is a chameleon as the seats can be folded flat or down as well and upwards. Basically, you your teen can carry their school bags, sports equipments, music instruments and any other baggage they take to high school or college without causing any damage to the car.

Kia Soul

Price: $29,900

MPG: 24 City, 30 Highway

This crossover has become quite popular because of its style and flexibility. This urban hatchback provides many options such as bigger wheels and an 8-inch navigation screen.

Mazda3

Price: $30,069

MPG: 30 City, 41 Highway

The Japanese carmaker has always added features to its cars to make them more fun. The famous “zoom-zoom” factor adds more appeal to the model, especially if you choose the forward collision warning that increases the car’s rating to Top Safety Pick+.

Chevy Sonic

Price: $30,108

MPG: 26 City, 35 Highway

Chevy made this small car, which is not something known for, and succeeded by producing a surprisingly spacious and functional vehicle with a good interior and one of the best infotainment systems out there.

Hyundai Elantra

Price: $31,793 

MPG: 28 City, 38 Highway

The Hyundai Elantra is roomy, has great safety rating and it is easy to be operated. The car has quite a sophisticated styling at a great value and it is proof that Hyundai did an awesome job to transform itself from an econobox car brand.

Subaru Impreza

Price: $31,864

MPG: 28 City, 37 Highway

This one marks all our requests for a teen car: it is fun to drive, safe, and it’s practical. It has on-road manners and a really good infotainment system. And parents can choose the EyeSight crash avoidance system for the car, which is available as a sedan or a wagon.

Toyota Prius

Price: $34,633

MPG: 51 City, 48 Highway

While it might not be the most exciting car in our list, it s a hybrid with a Top Safety Pick rating and super good mileage. Take into account that a new version of the world’s best selling hybrid will be launched on the market in the upcoming months. If you decide to wait for it, we can assure you it has better styling, more space and a 10% increase in fuel economy.

Volkswagen Golf

Price: $35,710 

MPG: 25 City, 37 Highway

With an entire range of models, you can choose what the best car is for you. The Golf group has won the North American Car of the Year award and has the Motor Trend Car of the Year. It’s up to you and your teenager if you opt for a diesel, an all-electric, any of the gas versions or the sporty Golf R.

Jeep Renegade

Price: $18,990 (base price, not including ownership)

MPG: 24 City, 31 Highway

Even if the Wrangler is more attractive for most teens, the new Renegade SUV is safer, more practical and an affordable alternative. It is spacious, so your teen can take their friends along, fun to drive and for an extra touch, it has removable roof panels.

Ford Focus

Price: $34,153+

MPG: 26 City, 36 Highway

This Ford’ compact model has more room than the little Fiesta with almost the same fuel economy. It is fun, practical and it is more stylish than other models on our list. It has an efficient 1.0-liter turbo EcoBoost engine that will bump fuel economy to 40 mpg.

 

By Gabriela Florea

  • Thomas Lee Mullins

    Those seem awfully expensive for a teenager to drive. The lowest is the Jeep Renegade. There must be lower priced cars out there that are more suitable for teenagers.

    • Rory

      ….and the Renegade “doesn’t include ownership” – what the heck does that mean?