VW fails to get US recall approval for 3.0-litre diesels image

California regulators rejected Volkswagen’s proposal for a recall plan for around 16,000 larger premium diesels fitted with the emissions cheating device.

Even if Volkswagen settled with the US authorities over around 480,000 diesel-cheating cars powered by the 2.0-litre TDIs, the scandal is far from being over. There are still 85,000 3.0-litre SUVs and limousines from Audi, Porsche and VW that have to be mended. The automaker said last month that a proper fix for those premium cars would not be complicated and talks with the regulators were rapidly advancing on the matter. However, California Air Resources Board seems not to share the same perspective, as it has just rejected VW’s recall plan for around 16,000 affected V6 diesels in the state, calling the company’s proposal “incomplete, substantially deficient, and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements.”

The German automaker is trying to avoid another expensive agreement, as a buy back deal for the more expensive vehicles could add billions to the cost of its US scandal. As part of the agreement struck last month, owners that decide to return the cars will receive a cash payment of at least dollars 5,100, while some of them may get as much as 10,000 dollars.

The US District Judge Charles Breyer, who supervises the US Dieselgate, did not impose a deadline for a fix of the larger diesels, but he set a hearing for August 25 to get an update from the company and US regulators.

Via Bloomberg