VW’s diesel recall plan in Germany not going so swiftly, report says image

Volkswagen’s plan to fix about 2.5 million diesel cars in Germany is being delayed by weeks, a daily newspaper reported.

If the German automaker is still under scrutiny in the United States for not receiving the regulator’s approval for fixing almost 600,000 affected diesels yet, the European recall is already under way, but it does not quite have the proper pace. In late February, Volkswagen received the final approval from the German authorities for the first stage of its European recall plan, a small step towards mending 8.5 million cars on the continent fitted with the cheating device. Three weeks after the start of the campaign, the company announced it has already made the proper modifications on over 50 percent of the first wave and the new engine control software has been installed in some 4,300 Volkswagen Amarok pickups, while the 2.0-litre Passat engines should have been next in line.

However, it seems the carmaker has not yet received approval from the Federal Motor Transport Authority for the proposed technical fixes for the Passat model, the daily newspaper Bild reported on Wednesday, citing a KBA spokesman. The KBA was still examining the technical solutions submitted by VW and it is unclear whether the engine will comply with Euro 5 emission standards after the refitting, Bild quoted the KBA spokesman as saying. Europe’s largest automaker has originally planned to start refitting more than 500,000 Passats on February 29, Bild said. Modification of the 1.2-liter engines is scheduled for the end of the second quarter and, completing the recall, while the measures for vehicles with a 1.6-litre engine will be carried out from the third quarter of 2016, VW initially announced.

Via Reuters